Guest Post: Top Five Books on Child Development

**I am so pleased with today’s guest post written by freelance writer, Naomi Esterly. She contacted me a short time ago about a guest post for Close Families, and she came up with a very informative post featuring five books for child development. I hope you enjoy it! Thank you for contributing here at Close Families, Naomi!**

About Naomi:

Naomi Esterly is a stay-at-home mom to two rambunctious, yet adorable, little boys and a newborn baby girl. In her spare time she balances writing freelance for 1800Wheelchair.Com and coaching her community’s little league.

Top Five Books on Child Development

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The health and development of a child will be established in their early years. It might seem unlikely but it’s within these formative years that the child develops the foundation of the person he or she will be. There will be milestones, tell tale signs, that parents, family and health professionals may need to note in order to ensure a child reaches their full potential through adulthood.

Here are five books on child development that could be beneficial in this arena.

How to Raise a Healthy Child in Spite of Your Doctor
By Robert S. Mendelsohn

A renowned pediatrician and author, Dr. Mendelsohn looks to demystify the medical profession. In this book, he hopes to give parents practical advice about relying too heavily on pediatricians and how they should take a stronger role in their child’s care. Subjects include Protecting Your Children Before They are Born, The Mythical Menace of Strep Throat and The Child Who Never Sits Still.

Baby Sign Language Basics: Early Communication for Hearing Babies and Toddlers
By Monta Z. Briant

Studies have demonstrated that signing babies will talk sooner; maintain a stronger bond with parents; have larger vocabularies; show a greater interest in reading; show less frustration and spend less time crying and throwing tantrums; and will have increased IQs. This book hopes to encourage parents to explore these possibilities with their child through fun and easy steps to signing together.

Power of Play: How Spontaneous, Imaginative Activities Lead to Happier, Healthier Children
By David Elkind

Children are going to play. The Power of Play explores the idea of how imaginative, unscheduled play has a significant, long term impact on a successful social and academic career. Play is as important as learning and parents may need to curb those beliefs that a child should be constantly engaged in educational activities. The book combines research and personal anecdotes to make its argument.

What to Expect the First Year
By Heidi Murkoff

Considered a milestone in guides for child care, this book covers the first year of the relationship between parent and child. It incorporates advances in pediatric medicine in an exemplary user friendly manner. Topics include the expanded role of the father, sleep problems, causes of colic, SIDS, returning to work, siblings, weaning, sippy cups, how to give a bath and much more.

Raising an Emotionally Intelligent Child: The Heart of Parenting Book
By John Gottman

With an intent of increasing self confidence and contributing to greater mental, social and physical health, this book explores coaching your child to regulate their emotions. The author believes doing so will have long lasting benefits in school performance and beyond. Subjects include empathetic listening and validation of feelings, solving issues in rational manners and labeling emotions with words children understand.

Children are spontaneous and mercurial. Their reactions are actually natural, if not considered acceptable. They do grow out of it, but how they do so is an important consideration. Parents should see these formative years as the perfect opportunity to help the child’s emotional growth. They should use them to engage with the child in emotional, physical and educational manners to ensure the best possible outcomes. The five titles above all have tremendous potential in that area.

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4 Comments on “Guest Post: Top Five Books on Child Development”

  1. Awesome, I’m excited to look into some of these. I have a few of them already, but its always great to hear about other books out there!

  2. I am thankful you shared a résumé of these books, as a first time mom of a 19 month old, I am having a lot of questions lately, I’ve asked some parents around about things that are preoccupying me but I’m getting very different answers, so a little bit of reading and research will be good for me 🙂 thanks for sharing 🙂

    • Laura says:

      I’m so glad you find the list to be helpful! One other quick suggestion to look into: The Happiest Toddler on the Block by Dr. Harvey Karp. I have not read that one, but I’ve seen him in an interview, and he had some wonderful pointers for parents with children your child’s age!


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